Why Do Wounds Itch When They Are Healing?
Everyone has wondered, “Why do wounds itch when they are healing?” Medical professionals do not know, but there are several theories.

The Healing Process
If you want to know, “Why do wounds itch when they are healing?” you need to understand the healing process. Your skin is your first line of defense against things that can harm you. Just like in a security system, when the perimeter is penetrated, alarms start going off. This alerts the body to spring into action, and start healing.

Here are the four steps in the healing process:
• The first stage is hemostasis.  After the blood vessels narrow, slowing blood loss, platelets stick together and make a platelet plug at the site of the wound. Then coagulation occurs as fibrin makes a kind of mesh trap and platelets and red blood cells get caught and form a clot.
• Next is the inflammatory stage during which the body begins cleaning the wound.  Debris is taken away from the site to prevent infection.
• The proliferative phase is the next stage.  The body begins to make new blood vessels and new skin is made.
• Finally comes the maturation and re-modification phase.  Other damaged cells are repaired, including nerve cells. 

Why Do Wounds Itch When They Are Healing?
There are several theories that explain why scabs itch. There are histamines in scabs that irritate the skin around the wound. Some doctors think this is the body’s way of getting rid of the scab which is no longer needed. When it itches, you scratch it and it is comes off. There is a flaw in this theory, because sometimes the scab itches before the wound is healed.
A second theory has to do with nerves in your skin that are cut when the skin is cut. When a wound is healing, the new skin is very thin, so the nerves are even more sensitive. As they are healing, their signals may be affected and the brain gets the wrong type of signal. The brain may interpret it as an itch and want to respond by scratching it.
Another theory is that as the wound heals, the scab pulls on the new skin, and that causes the area around the scab to itch.
Lastly, dryness could be a reason for itching. When the wound occurred, the skin, nerves, and oil glands were affected, and without oil, the skin would become dry.

Scratching the Itch
There are several things that may help alleviate the itch of a scab:
• Apply an antibiotic cream as soon as possible. This may help the wound heal faster and have a smaller scab, so it won’t itch as much.• Keeping the wound covered is important to keep it clean so infection will not set in.
• Lastly, you can try over-the-counter products such as anti-itch cream or vitamin E oil. These will help protect and cool the itch and the gentle massage as you apply them can also be soothing.  

First Aid
If you can even ask the question, “Why do wounds itch when they are healing?” then your wound is probably getting better, which is a good thing. In order for healing to happen, a little basic first aid is required. 
• Stop the bleeding by continuously applying gentle pressure, with gauze or a clean cloth, for 20-30 minutes. If you move the cloth to check on it, this will move the clot and the bleeding will start again. Seek medical help if this does not stop the bleeding.
• Clean the wound by putting the wounded area under cool, running water, if possible. Clean the area around it with gauze or soap and a cloth.
• Apply an antibiotic. Apply a thin layer of a topical antibiotic cream. This will help prevent infection and aid in healing.
• Cover the wound. Always put an adhesive bandage across a cut, not lengthwise.  When the wound begins healing, then exposure to air will be helpful and bandages are no longer necessary.
• Change the dressing daily or if it gets dirty or wet. You don’t need a bandage after a scab forms.
• Get stitches for deep wounds more than a 1/4 inch deep or if it has an irregular edge. This needs to be done soon after the accident to avoid infection.
Info Found Here: http://bit.ly/WbR09s

Why Do Wounds Itch When They Are Healing?

Everyone has wondered, “Why do wounds itch when they are healing?” Medical professionals do not know, but there are several theories.

The Healing Process

If you want to know, “Why do wounds itch when they are healing?” you need to understand the healing process. Your skin is your first line of defense against things that can harm you. Just like in a security system, when the perimeter is penetrated, alarms start going off. This alerts the body to spring into action, and start healing.

Here are the four steps in the healing process:

The first stage is hemostasis.  After the blood vessels narrow, slowing blood loss, platelets stick together and make a platelet plug at the site of the wound. Then coagulation occurs as fibrin makes a kind of mesh trap and platelets and red blood cells get caught and form a clot.

Next is the inflammatory stage during which the body begins cleaning the wound.  Debris is taken away from the site to prevent infection.

The proliferative phase is the next stage.  The body begins to make new blood vessels and new skin is made.

Finally comes the maturation and re-modification phase.  Other damaged cells are repaired, including nerve cells. 

Why Do Wounds Itch When They Are Healing?

There are several theories that explain why scabs itch. There are histamines in scabs that irritate the skin around the wound. Some doctors think this is the body’s way of getting rid of the scab which is no longer needed. When it itches, you scratch it and it is comes off. There is a flaw in this theory, because sometimes the scab itches before the wound is healed.

A second theory has to do with nerves in your skin that are cut when the skin is cut. When a wound is healing, the new skin is very thin, so the nerves are even more sensitive. As they are healing, their signals may be affected and the brain gets the wrong type of signal. The brain may interpret it as an itch and want to respond by scratching it.

Another theory is that as the wound heals, the scab pulls on the new skin, and that causes the area around the scab to itch.

Lastly, dryness could be a reason for itching. When the wound occurred, the skin, nerves, and oil glands were affected, and without oil, the skin would become dry.

Scratching the Itch

There are several things that may help alleviate the itch of a scab:

Apply an antibiotic cream as soon as possible. This may help the wound heal faster and have a smaller scab, so it won’t itch as much.• Keeping the wound covered is important to keep it clean so infection will not set in.

Lastly, you can try over-the-counter products such as anti-itch cream or vitamin E oil. These will help protect and cool the itch and the gentle massage as you apply them can also be soothing.  

First Aid

If you can even ask the question, “Why do wounds itch when they are healing?” then your wound is probably getting better, which is a good thing. In order for healing to happen, a little basic first aid is required. 

Stop the bleeding by continuously applying gentle pressure, with gauze or a clean cloth, for 20-30 minutes. If you move the cloth to check on it, this will move the clot and the bleeding will start again. Seek medical help if this does not stop the bleeding.

Clean the wound by putting the wounded area under cool, running water, if possible. Clean the area around it with gauze or soap and a cloth.

Apply an antibiotic. Apply a thin layer of a topical antibiotic cream. This will help prevent infection and aid in healing.

Cover the wound. Always put an adhesive bandage across a cut, not lengthwise.  When the wound begins healing, then exposure to air will be helpful and bandages are no longer necessary.

Change the dressing daily or if it gets dirty or wet. You don’t need a bandage after a scab forms.

Get stitches for deep wounds more than a 1/4 inch deep or if it has an irregular edge. This needs to be done soon after the accident to avoid infection.

Info Found Here: http://bit.ly/WbR09s